Toll in Japan flood disaster rises to 179: government

PTI

Kurashiki : A helicopter flies over a flooded housing area in Kurashiki, Okayama prefecture, western Japan Monday, July 9, 2018. People prepared for risky search and cleanup efforts in southwestern Japan on July 9, where several days of heavy rainfall had set off flooding and landslides in a widespread area. AP/PTI

Kurashiki : A helicopter flies over a flooded housing area in Kurashiki, Okayama prefecture, western Japan. People prepared for risky search and cleanup efforts in southwestern Japan on July 9, where several days of heavy rainfall had set off flooding and landslides in a widespread area. AP/PTI

The toll in record rains that have devastated parts of Japan has risen to 179, the government’s top spokesman said on Wednesday.

Search-and-rescue operations are continuing after floods and landslides caused by the rains, and local media said several dozen people were still missing in Japan’s deadliest weather-related disaster in over three decades.

Yoshihide Suga said at least ten people were still missing, though local media said dozens were still unaccounted for as rescue operations continue.

“Rescue efforts are a battle with time,” Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told reporters. “The rescue teams are doing their utmost.” The Japan Meteorological Agency said three hours of rainfall in one area in Kochi prefecture reached an accumulated 26.3 centimetres (10.4 inches), the highest since such records started in 1976.

The assessment of casualties has been difficult because of the widespread area affected by the rainfall, flooding and landslides. Authorities warned landslides could strike even after rain subsides as the calamity shaped up to be potentially the worst in decades.

Kochi prefecture, on Shikoku, issued landslide warnings almost over the entire island. Public broadcaster NHK TV showed overturned cars on roads covered with mud. A convenience store worker, who had fled to a nearby rooftop, said water had reached as high as his head.

Kurashiki : In this July 7, 2018 photo, a resident is rescued in a flooded area in Kurashiki, Okayama prefecture, following heavy rain. Heavy rainfall hammered southern Japan for the third day, prompting new disaster warnings on Kyushu and Shikoku islands on July 8. AP/PTI

Kurashiki : In this July 7, 2018 photo, a resident is rescued in a flooded area in Kurashiki, Okayama prefecture, following heavy rain. Heavy rainfall hammered southern Japan for the third day, prompting new disaster warnings on Kyushu and Shikoku islands on July 8. AP/PTI

The Japanese government set up an emergency office, designed for crises such as major earthquakes.

A residential area in Okayama prefecture, on the main island of Honshu, was seeped in brown water spreading like a huge lake. Some people fled to rooftops and balconies and waved furiously at hovering rescue helicopters. Military paddle boats were also being used to take people to dry land.

Okayama prefecture said three people had died, six others were missing and seven were injured, one of them seriously Six homes were destroyed, while nearly 500 were flooded. Evacuation orders or advisories were issued to more than 910,000 people, the prefecture said in a statement.

Kyodo news service reported several deaths in a landslide in Hiroshima and more bodies were retrieved from collapsed housing in the ancient capital of Kyoto, both areas where the rainfall was heavy in the past few days.

Throughout the hard hit areas, rivers swelled and parked cars sat in pools of water. Japan has sent troops, firefighters, police and other disaster relief. People have also taken to social media to plead for help.

In Ehime prefecture, a woman was found dead on the second floor of a home buried by a landslide, Kyodo said. Also in Ehime, two elementary schoolgirls and their mother who got sucked into a mudslide were pulled out but could not be revived, it said.

(PTI)