Chinese presence along Indian border on rise: US

RSTV Bureau
New Delhi: Union Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar with Vice-Chairman of the Central Military Commission of China, Fan Changlong during his ceremonial welcome at South Block in New Delhi, November 16, 2015. Photo - PTI

New Delhi: Union Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar with Vice-Chairman of the Central Military Commission of China, Fan Changlong during his ceremonial welcome at South Block in New Delhi, November 16, 2015.
Photo – PTI

United States department of Defence said that China has increased defence capabilities and deployed more troops along the Indian border. The US Defence department known as Pentagon said that China is increasing its military base in various parts of the world, particularly Pakistan.

“We have noticed an increase in capability and force posture by the Chinese military in areas close to the border with India,” said Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defence for East Asia Abraham M Denmark.

Referring to US Defence Secretary Ashton Carter’s recent trip to India, Denmark said he had a very positive and productive visit.

“We’re going to continue to enhance our bilateral engagement with India, not in the China context, but because India is an increasingly important player by themselves. And we are going to engage India because of its value,” he said.

China’s expanding international economic interests are increasing demands for the PLA Navy (PLAN) to operate in more distant seas to protect Chinese citizens, investments, and critical sea lines of communication, said a report released by Abraham.

The information was made available by Pentagon in its report titles “Military and Security Developments Involving the People’s Republic of China.’

“China most likely will seek to establish additional naval logistics hubs in countries with which it has a longstanding friendly relationship and similar strategic interests, such as Pakistan, and a precedent for hosting foreign militaries,” the report said.

The Pentagon in its report expressed its concerns about Chinese military buildup near the Indian border.

“Tensions remain along disputed portions of the Sino-Indian border, where both sides patrol with armed forces . . . . After a five-day military standoff in September 2015 at Burtse in Northern Ladakh, China and India held a senior-level flag-officer meeting, agreed to maintain peace, and retreated to positions mutually acceptable to both sides,” it said.

The Pentagon said tensions remain with India along their shared 4,057-km border over Arunachal Pradesh (which China asserts is part of Tibet and, therefore, of China), and over the Askai Chin region at the western end of the Tibetan Plateau, despite increases in China-India political and economic relations. The Pentagon said Pakistan remains China’s primary customer for conventional weapons.

China engages in both arms sales and defense industrial cooperation with Pakistan, including LY-80 surface-to-air missile systems, F-22P frigates with helicopters, main battle tank production, air-to-air missiles, and anti-ship cruise missiles. In June 2014, Pakistan started co-producing the first two of 50 Block 2 JF-17s, which is an upgraded version of the Block I JF-17, it said.

In October 2013, Chinese and Indian officials signed the Border Defence Cooperation Agreement, which supplements existing procedures managing the interaction of forces along the Line of Actual Control (LAC).

The report said that China and India continue to accuse each other of frequent incursions and military build-ups along the disputed territories, with the most recent incident occurring in September 2015 along the LAC at Burtse in Northern Ladakh. After a five-day standoff, China and India held a senior-level flag meeting and agreed to maintain peace and retreat to positions mutually acceptable to both sides.

Noting that China’s use of force in territorial disputes has varied widely throughout its history, it said some disputes led to war, such as China’s border conflicts with India in 1962 and Vietnam in 1979.

In more recent cases, China has been willing to compromise with and even offer concessions to its neighbours.

Since 1998, China has settled 11 land-based territorial disputes with six of its neighbours. In recent years, China has adopted a coercive approach that eschews military conflict in order to deal with several disputes continue over exclusive economic zones and ownership of potentially rich, offshore oil and gas deposits, the Pentagon said.

Chinese presence along Indian border on rise: US

RSTV Bureau
New Delhi: Union Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar with Vice-Chairman of the Central Military Commission of China, Fan Changlong during his ceremonial welcome at South Block in New Delhi, November 16, 2015. Photo - PTI

New Delhi: Union Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar with Vice-Chairman of the Central Military Commission of China, Fan Changlong during his ceremonial welcome at South Block in New Delhi, November 16, 2015.
Photo – PTI

United States department of Defence said that China has increased defence capabilities and deployed more troops along the Indian border. The US Defence department known as Pentagon said that China is increasing its military base in various parts of the world, particularly Pakistan.

“We have noticed an increase in capability and force posture by the Chinese military in areas close to the border with India,” said Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defence for East Asia Abraham M Denmark.

Referring to US Defence Secretary Ashton Carter’s recent trip to India, Denmark said he had a very positive and productive visit.

“We’re going to continue to enhance our bilateral engagement with India, not in the China context, but because India is an increasingly important player by themselves. And we are going to engage India because of its value,” he said.

China’s expanding international economic interests are increasing demands for the PLA Navy (PLAN) to operate in more distant seas to protect Chinese citizens, investments, and critical sea lines of communication, said a report released by Abraham.

The information was made available by Pentagon in its report titles “Military and Security Developments Involving the People’s Republic of China.’

“China most likely will seek to establish additional naval logistics hubs in countries with which it has a longstanding friendly relationship and similar strategic interests, such as Pakistan, and a precedent for hosting foreign militaries,” the report said.

The Pentagon in its report expressed its concerns about Chinese military buildup near the Indian border.

“Tensions remain along disputed portions of the Sino-Indian border, where both sides patrol with armed forces . . . . After a five-day military standoff in September 2015 at Burtse in Northern Ladakh, China and India held a senior-level flag-officer meeting, agreed to maintain peace, and retreated to positions mutually acceptable to both sides,” it said.

The Pentagon said tensions remain with India along their shared 4,057-km border over Arunachal Pradesh (which China asserts is part of Tibet and, therefore, of China), and over the Askai Chin region at the western end of the Tibetan Plateau, despite increases in China-India political and economic relations. The Pentagon said Pakistan remains China’s primary customer for conventional weapons.

China engages in both arms sales and defense industrial cooperation with Pakistan, including LY-80 surface-to-air missile systems, F-22P frigates with helicopters, main battle tank production, air-to-air missiles, and anti-ship cruise missiles. In June 2014, Pakistan started co-producing the first two of 50 Block 2 JF-17s, which is an upgraded version of the Block I JF-17, it said.

In October 2013, Chinese and Indian officials signed the Border Defence Cooperation Agreement, which supplements existing procedures managing the interaction of forces along the Line of Actual Control (LAC).

The report said that China and India continue to accuse each other of frequent incursions and military build-ups along the disputed territories, with the most recent incident occurring in September 2015 along the LAC at Burtse in Northern Ladakh. After a five-day standoff, China and India held a senior-level flag meeting and agreed to maintain peace and retreat to positions mutually acceptable to both sides.

Noting that China’s use of force in territorial disputes has varied widely throughout its history, it said some disputes led to war, such as China’s border conflicts with India in 1962 and Vietnam in 1979.

In more recent cases, China has been willing to compromise with and even offer concessions to its neighbours.

Since 1998, China has settled 11 land-based territorial disputes with six of its neighbours. In recent years, China has adopted a coercive approach that eschews military conflict in order to deal with several disputes continue over exclusive economic zones and ownership of potentially rich, offshore oil and gas deposits, the Pentagon said.