EU summit: Britain must exit immediately

RSTV Bureau
London : In this image taken from the Parliamentary Recording Unit Britain's Prime Minister, David Cameron, centre right, addresses the House of Commons in London, Monday June 27, 2016, regarding the result of the referendum vote on leaving the EU which took place Thursday.  Cameron advised the house that the United Kingdom will not trigger formal EU exit talks at this stage. AP/PTI

London : In this image taken from the Parliamentary Recording Unit Britain’s Prime Minister, David Cameron, centre right, addresses the House of Commons in London, Monday June 27, 2016, regarding the result of the referendum vote on leaving the EU which took place Thursday. Cameron advised the house that the United Kingdom will not trigger formal EU exit talks at this stage. AP/PTI

European Union is holding a two-day summit in Brussels to discuss impact of Brexit on Europe. This is the first time that the British Prime Minister David Cameron will hold talks with EU leaders after UK voted to leave the union.

In the meet, the European parliament called for an “immediate triggering of Brexit.”

The “will expressed by the people needs to be entirely and fully respected, starting with an immediate activation of Article 50,” said a resolution approved by MEPs at an emergency session. 395 voted in favour of the resolution while only 200 voted against it. 71
MEPs abstained.

The meeting comes a day after leaders of Germany, France and Italy urged Britain not to waste time in starting a divorce procedure with the European Union. They also refused to negotiate the details of UK’s exit until it officially announces its departure from the union.

Even as EU leaders asked Britain not to waste time to make the official announcement, British Prime Minister David Cameron told Parliament on Monday that he was going to leave the formalities of Brexit to his successor when he steps down in October.

He also lay to rest all calls for a second referendum.

“I am clear and the cabinet agreed this morning that the decision must be accepted and the process of implementing the decision in the best possible way must now begin,” Cameron told members of the House of Commons.

A petition on the UK Parliament website, which has been signed by more than 3.7 million people, calls for a second referendum on the UK’s relationship with the EU.

“As we proceed with implementing this decision and facing the challenges that it will undoubtedly bring, I believe we should hold fast to a vision of Britain that wants to be respected abroad, tolerant at home, engaged in the world,” Cameron added.

Despite the referendum result of Brexit last week, Britain’s divorce procedure with the EU will only start when the country formally notifies its intention to leave, activating the Article 50 of Lisbon Treaty which has never been invoked before.

London :   Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron leaves 10 Downing Street in London, to address Parliament on Britain's European Union referendum choice to leave, Monday, June 27, 2016. Political turmoil has roiled Britain since the European Union referendum result to leave, as leaders of the government and opposition parties grapple with the question of how precisely the U.K. will separate from the other 27 nations in the bloc. AP /PTI Photo

London : Britain’s Prime Minister David Cameron leaves 10 Downing Street in London, to address Parliament on Britain’s European Union referendum choice to leave, Monday, June 27, 2016. Political turmoil has roiled Britain since the European Union referendum result to leave, as leaders of the government and opposition parties grapple with the question of how precisely the U.K. will separate from the other 27 nations in the bloc. AP /PTI Photo

British Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne said on Monday that Britain would trigger the exit procedure only when there is a clear view about new relations between Britain and the EU.

German, French and Italian leaders agreed that there will be no informal or formal discussions on the exit of Britain until the European Council received an application for withdraw, said German Chancellor Angela Merkel at a joint press conference with French President Francois Hollande and Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi after the talks in Berlin.

Hollande said “there is no time to lose”, urging the British government to submit a formal exit application as soon as possible in order to start negotiations.

The three leaders also said in a joint statement that they will propose at a summit starting Tuesday in Brussels to “launch a process based on a concrete timetable and precise commitments to find solutions to the challenges that arose from the result of the referendum in the United Kingdom, and to develop concrete solutions for a better future for the EU and its citizens”.

(With inputs from agencies)