Mugabe clings to office, defies resignation speculations

RSTV Bureau
In this Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2009 file photo, Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe inspects the guard of honour during the official opening of the second session of the seventh parliament of Zimbabwe in Harare.

In this Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2009 file photo, Zimbabwe’s President Robert Mugabe inspects the guard of honour during the official opening of the second session of the seventh parliament of Zimbabwe in Harare.

In a surprise announcement soon after reports of demitting office, Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe told he is still in power. Using a TV address he announced that he is still the President despite a military takeover in a mounting clamour for his autocratic 37-year rule to end.

“The (ruling ZANU-PF) party congress is due in a few weeks and I will preside over its processes,” Mugabe said, pitching the country into deep uncertainty.

Many Zimbabweans had expected Mugabe, 93, to announce his resignation after the army seized power, opened the floodgates of citizen protest and his once-loyal party told him to quit.

But Mugabe, sitting alongside the uniformed generals who were behind the military intervention, delivered a speech that conveyed he was unruffled by the turmoil.

Speaking slowly and occasionally stumbling as he read from the pages, Mugabe talked of the need for solidarity to resolve national problems — business-as-usual rhetoric that he has deployed over decades.

“The operation I have alluded to did not amount to a threat to our well-cherished constitutional order nor did it challenge my authority as head of state, not even as commander in chief,” he said.

“We must learn to forgive and resolve contradictions, real or perceived, in a comradely Zimbabwean spirit,” he said.

His address provoked immediate anger, and raised concerns that Zimbabwe could be at risk of a violent reaction to the political turmoil.

Army soldiers stand guard as protesters demanding President Robert Mugabe stands down gather on the road leading to State House in Harare, Zimbabwe Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017. In a euphoric gathering that just days ago would have drawn a police crackdown, crowds marched through Zimbabwe's capital on Saturday to demand the departure of President Robert Mugabe, one of Africa's last remaining liberation leaders, after nearly four decades in power.

Army soldiers stand guard as protesters demanding President Robert Mugabe stands down gather on the road leading to State House in Harare, Zimbabwe Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017. Photo – PTI

On Saturday, in scenes of public elation not seen since Zimbabwe’s independence in 1980, huge crowds had marched and sang their way through Harare, believing Mugabe was about to step down.

Highlighting the contradictions in Zimbabwean politics, the ruling ZANU-PF party sacked Mugabe as its leader earlier on Sunday and told him to resign as head of state, naming ousted vice president Emmerson Mnangagwa as the new party chief.

The factional succession race that triggered Zimbabwe’s sudden crisis was between party hardliner Mnangagwa – known as the Crocodile — and a group called “Generation 40″, or “G40″, because its members are generally younger, which campaigned for Grace’s cause.

The president, who is feted in parts of Africa as the continent’s last surviving independence leader, is in fragile health. But he previously said he would stand in elections next year that would see him remain in power until he was nearly 100 years old.

He became prime minister on Zimbabwe’s independence from Britain in 1980 and then president in 1987.

Zimbabwe’s economic output has halved since 2000 when many white-owned farms were seized, leaving the key agricultural sector in ruins.

(With inputs from Agencies)