Muslim bodies oppose Law Comm move on Civil Code

RSTV Bureau
New Delhi : Syed Mohammad Wali Rahmani, General Secretary of the All India Muslim Personal Law Board (AIMPLB) with Jamiat Ulema-e-Hind President Maulana Syed Arshad Madani (L) and others during a press conference in New Delhi. Photo - PTI

New Delhi : Syed Mohammad Wali Rahmani, General Secretary of the All India Muslim Personal Law Board (AIMPLB) with Jamiat Ulema-e-Hind President Maulana Syed Arshad Madani (L) and others during a press conference in New Delhi.
Photo – PTI

Muslims bodies have opposed the Law Commission’s questionnaire seeking public feedback on the issues of Triple Talaq and the Uniform Civil Code. Criticising the Law commission, All Indian Muslim Personal Law Board and various other Muslim outfits announced that they will be boycotting the move.

In a first such initiative, the Law Commission had on October 7 sought feedback from public on whether the practice of Triple Talaq be abolished and whether a uniform civil code should be optional.

Addressing a press conference in the national capital on Thursday, several Muslim bodies contended that Uniform Civil Code (UCC), if implemented, will paint all people in “one colour” which will threaten the country’s pluralism and diversity.

File Photo of a gathering of Muslim girls.

File Photo of a gathering of Muslim girls.

“The government is trying to divert attention of people from its failure. We hope it withdraws the move. If it doesn’t, we will decide on our future course of action. At present, we are trying to create awareness among Muslims in the country,” Jamiat-Ulema -e-Hind president Maulana Arshad Madani said.

The outfits also countered the government’s stand on the issue of triple talaq. They claimed of lesser number of divorce cases in the Muslim community vis-a-vis other communities.

“People of different cultures stay in this country. If the UCC is implemented, attempts will be made to paint all in one colour, which is not in the interest of the country,” Maulana Arshad Madani said adding, “we don’t want the practice of triple talaq to be abolished.”

Last week, for the first time ever, the Central government had opposed the practice of triple talaq, ‘nikah halala’ and polygamy among Muslims while arguing before the Supreme Court.

Responding to a batch of petitions in the Supreme Court challenging the validity of such practices among Muslims, the Union Ministry of Law and Justice, in its affidavit, referred to constitutional principles like gender equality, secularism, international covenants, religious practices and marital law prevalent in various Islamic countries to drive home the point.

File photo of Supreme Court of India.

File photo of Supreme Court of India.

The Centre’s move was strongly opposed by prominent Muslim organisations, which had dubbed it an “infringement” and insisted that there should be no interference “in the belief and religion of any citizen”.

Meanwhile today, AIMPLB general secretary Wali Rehmani along with Madani and the representatives of other bodies said all the Muslim sects and its women were “one” on these issues.

Even the women members of the Board stressed that contrary to perception, the personal law balances rights of Muslim women and men “very well” and that there is no need for reforms in it.

“There is no need for any reform in the law. Triple talaq is not an issue and the government’s move to impose UCC intends to snatch our religious freedom guaranteed in the Indian Constitution. That’s the reason we are fighting for our rights,” Aasma Zehra, a Board member, said.

The Board, however, said that there are “flaws” in the personal laws governing Muslims and they are being addressed from time-to-time.

(With inputs from the PTI)