Seattle judge puts on hold Trump’s immigration order

RSTV Bureau
New York: Muslims and Yemenis gather with their supporters on the steps of Brooklyn's Borough Hall, during a protest against President Donald Trump’s temporary travel ban on citizens from seven predominantly Muslim countries, Thursday, Feb. 2, 2017, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Yemen is one of seven countries affected by the temporary travel ban. The others are Libya, Iraq, Iran, Somalia, Sudan and Syria. AP/PTI

New York: Muslims and Yemenis gather with their supporters on the steps of Brooklyn’s Borough Hall, during a protest against President Donald Trump‚Äôs temporary travel ban on citizens from seven predominantly Muslim countries, Thursday, Feb. 2, 2017, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Yemen is one of seven countries affected by the temporary travel ban. The others are Libya, Iraq, Iran, Somalia, Sudan and Syria. AP/PTI

In a big blow to Trump administration, an American judge has imposed a temporary, nationwide hold on President Trump’s ban on travellers and immigrants from seven Muslim-majority nations.

The controversial Trump order had banned migrants from Iran, Iraq, Sudan, Syria, Libya, Yemen and Somalia from entering the US for a period of 90 days as part of new measures to “keep radical Islamic terrorists” out of America.

Post the judgement, the White House said that it’ll file for an emergency order against the federal judge’s ruling.

“At the earliest possible time, the Department of Justice intends to file an emergency stay of this order and defend the executive order of the President, which we believe is lawful and appropriate,” White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said in a statement.

“The President’s order is intended to protect the homeland and he has the constitutional authority and responsibility to protect the American people,” he added.

US District Judge James Robart in Seattle issued the temporary restraining order that will remain valid nationwide pending a full review of a complaint by Washington state attorney general Bob Ferguson.

The temporary restraining order immediately stops federal officials from enforcing parts of the ban that target immigrants and refugees from seven Muslim-majority countries and stops them from enforcing parts of the ban that grant exemptions based on religion.

“The Constitution prevailed today. No one is above the law — not even the President,” Ferguson said after the ruling.

Hailing the court ruling, Indian-American Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal said, “This is fantastic and critically important news. These orders are inhumane and unconstitutional.”
Meanwhile, the State Department revealed that US had cancelled 60,000 visas since President Donald Trump signed the controversial order.

“Fewer than 60,000 individuals’ visas were provisionally revoked to comply with the executive order. We recognise that those individuals are temporarily inconvenienced while we conduct our review under the executive order,” said Will Cocks, spokesperson for Bureau of Consular Affairs Department of State.

(With inputs from agencies)