Super Tuesday 2.0: Trump, Hillary consolidate lead

RSTV Bureau
West Palm Beach : Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks greets people in the audience and takes photos during an election night event at the Palm Beach County Convention Center in West Palm Beach, Fla., Tuesday, March 15, 2016. AP/PTI

West Palm Beach : Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks greets people in the audience and takes photos during an election night event at the Palm Beach County Convention Center in West Palm Beach, Fla., Tuesday, March 15, 2016. AP/PTI

Front-runners in the US Presidential race, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump have pulled off big wins in the US primaries on Super Tuesday. Both front-runners took giant steps towards securing their parties’ presidential nomination by winning pivotal primaries in a multi-state vote.

Trump has won Florida, Illionois and North Carolina. On the other hand Democratic front-runner has bagged Florida, Illionois and Ohio. Experts say an epic clash between Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton in the US polls now seemed imminent.

In Florida, Trump secured a massive win which knocked out fellow Republican and Florida senator Marco Rubio from the race on his home turf.

Rubio polled just 27.8 per cent of the votes as against Trump’s impressive 45.3 per cent.

“Word is that, despite a record amount spent on negative and phony ads, I had a massive victory in Florida,” Trump said in a tweet even before major television channels projected his victory.

“There is great anger among the people. They want to see the country run properly,” Trump said in his victory speech.

“America’s in the middle of a real political storm…This is the right way forward for our party, for our country. But after tonight, it’s clear that while we are on the right side this year, we will not be on the winning side,” Rubio said before bowing out.

Trump kept a substantial lead in the delegate count by winning at least three Republican contests this Super Tuesday which is termed by many Super Tuesday as 2.0.

With this win, Trump bagged all the 99 delegates which were at stake in Florida. But 69-year-old real estate tycoon lost Ohio to Governor John Kasich. A win in Ohio could have sealed Trump’s fate in the Presidential race.

For Republicans, Florida and Ohio are key states in the race as the winning candidate gets all the delegates on offer – 99 in Florida and 66 in Ohio. These delegates go to the national convention in July where the presidential nominee is chosen.

Meanwhile Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton also sealed her lead with 3 wins in Florida, Ohio and North Carolina. The Former Secretary of State took big strides toward the Democratic
nomination by winning Florida and North Carolina while also posting crucial victories over rival Bernie Sanders in the industrial Midwest by taking Ohio and Illinois.

In Florida, Clinton had support of 65.6 per cent of the votes as against 30.6 per cent for Sanders.

“When we hear a candidate for president call for rounding up 12 million immigrants, banning all Muslims from entering the United States, when he embraces torture, that doesn’t make him strong, it makes him wrong,” Clinton said in her victory speech.

“We should be bringing down barriers, not building walls. You know, to be great, we can’t be small. We can’t lose what made America great in the first place,” she said amidst applause from her supporters in West palm Beach in Florida.

Both Clinton and Trump piled up the delegates, much more than their nearest opponents, but both of them were still haven’t secured the number of delegates required to be declared their respective parties’ presidential nominees.

Clinton has already piled up 1,561 delegates as against 800 delegates of her rival Sanders. She needs 2,382 of the 4,763 Democratic party delegates before the Philadelphia convention in July. 

With wins in 18 states so far, Trump also is far ahead of others in terms of delegate count. But political observers say a contested convention is a possibility as Trump may fall short of the delegate count for nomination.

In Super Tuesday 2.0, primary elections were held in five states of Florida, Ohio, North Carolina, Illinois and Missouri.

(With inputs from agencies)