Trump reviews military forces in South Korea

RSTV Bureau
Pyeongtaek: U.S. President Donald Trump, center left, kisses first lady Melania Trump as they arrive at Osan Air Base in Pyeongtaek, South Korea, Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017. Trump arrived here on the second leg of his five-nation Asian tour and will hold a summit with South Korean President Moon Jae-in. AP/PTI

Pyeongtaek: U.S. President Donald Trump, center left, kisses first lady Melania Trump as they arrive at Osan Air Base in Pyeongtaek, South Korea, Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017. Trump arrived here on the second leg of his five-nation Asian tour and will hold a summit with South Korean President Moon Jae-in. AP/PTI

US President Donald Trump landed in South Korea on Tuesday morning after wrapping up his visit to Japan. Trump reviewed American forces along the Korean peninsula and met with US and South Korean military leaders.

Trump’s visit to South Korea comes amidst rising tension in the Korean peninsula. His two-day visit is aimed at mounting pressure on Pyongyang, who has refused to abandon its nuclear weapons programme.

Trump travelled to Camp Humphreys, a military base about 40 miles south of Seoul, where he briefly addressed the interlocking issues of security and trade.

“Ultimately it will all work out. Because it always works out. It has to work out,” said Trump at the base camp while speaking about North Korea.

So far Trump has repeatedly struck a hard line against Pyongyang and South Korea was warily watching Trump as he was poised to deliver bellicose warnings in the shadow of the North Korea.

South Korea is the second stop on Trump’s five country Asian tour.

In Japan, he refused to rule out eventual military action against the north and exhorted dictator Kim Jong Un to stop weapons testing, calling the recent launches of missiles over American allies like Japan “a threat to the civilised world and international peace and stability.”

Trump and Moon agree on the need to pressure the North with sanctions and other deterrence measures. But Trump has threatened to “totally destroy” the North, if necessary, and repeatedly insisted that all options are on the table.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in, meanwhile, favours dialogue as the best strategy for defusing the nuclear tension and vehemently opposes a potential military clash that could cause enormous casualties in South Korea.

Trump backed up his strong words about North Korea by sending a budget request to Capitol Hill yesterday for USD 4 billion to support “additional efforts to detect, defeat, and defend against any North Korean use of ballistic missiles against the United States, its deployed forces, allies, or partners.”

(With inputs from agencies)